We Are Chicago

The Chicago Community Trust Leadership Campaign

The next plan for Chicago isn’t charted out on a blueprint.
Help Us In the ReImagining of Chicago

  • The Convener John H. Bryan, Jr.
  • The Connector John A. Canning, Jr.
  • The Planner Shawn M. Donnelley
  • The Realist Marshall Field V
  • The Pillar Arthur R. Velasquez
  • The Explorer Frank M. Clark
  • The Convener

    John H. Bryan, Jr.

    • John Bryan calls Chicago the quintessential American city. Art and modern architecture are an important part of that, he believes. But what matters more is a unified and harmonious civic community. Millennium Park is a very prominent and recent—but certainly not solitary—example of what people with common goals can realize, once inspired.

      He’s also proud that Chicago is home to one of the world’s largest and most admired community foundations—The Chicago Community Trust. "The Chicago Community Trust looks after all that goes on that makes the city great, and in that sense it is distinctive. It doesn't have a single mission except to serve the best interests of the people of Chicago, and of this City."

      That makes it a natural fit for fostering major public-private projects—just one among many powerful tools the Trust makes available for donors.

  • The Connector

    John A. Canning, Jr.

    • When John Canning thinks about the significance of a place like the Field Museum, he cites data—some of it surprising: 27 Ph.D.s doing research all over the world. The protection of 44,000 square miles of South American jungles. And, of course, 25 million objects in rotation for public display.

      He likes that his affinity for data and measurement is encouraged by the Trust. And he ventures that this capacity for analysis goes a long way toward fostering a unique culture of philanthropy in Chicago.

      "It takes time to find out which solutions have worked and which haven’t, or to identify areas where it’s time to take a risk and try something new," he says. "With over $175 million in grants being made through the Trust every year, that information is on hand. This ensures grants are efficient, and perhaps this is the reason we’ve seen Chicago’s philanthropic community come together like nowhere else."

  • The Planner

    Shawn M. Donnelley

    • One of the qualities Shawn Donnelley values most highly in Chicago is the generosity shown to artists and performers early in their careers. The time it takes to develop a craft and nurture a career is respected by audiences. By the world-class artists and Chicago icons who serve as mentors. And by philanthropists who bring stability in the form of endowment gifts.

      The result: an arts sector that blends superlative quality with the thrill of the experimental—and community bonds forged through shared one-of-a-kind experiences.

      It’s one thing to be attuned to a long horizon—but how we act now is what makes a difference. "Being a part of the Trust will enable my generation to decide what they want Chicago to be. And what they want the Trust to be," she says. "I'm excited because I get to be a part of something that really can endow the future of my city that I love."

  • The Realist

    Marshall Field V

    • Marshall Field V has thought long and hard about how to structure a lasting—and well-defined—legacy. His priorities: giving to Chicago, where his fortune was made; and trusting his vision to trained experts rather than burdening generations of heirs with executing it.

      He understands what the Trust understands: that when it comes to Chicago’s future, the possibilities are infinite. Every one of us may imagine—but never know—the ways Chicago will be transformed for generations to come. The Trust’s commitment: gifts made today will retain their relevance no matter how the landscape of needs changes.

  • The Pillar

    Arthur R. Velasquez

    • Growing up in Chicago, Art Velasquez sometimes wondered how to close the gap between his community on the West Side and that great city skyline his family would gaze at from a picnic blanket on summer nights. He made it his business to find the threads of connection—and when they didn’t exist, to build them.

      The essential element: people working together. Those with resources who strive to join forces and discover immediate opportunities to help. Those hard at work making sure no stone is unturned, no child overlooked. He tells us taking part has been a proud and satisfying accomplishment.

      "The National Museum of Mexican Art, Alivio Medical Center, El Valor—all of these organizations and many others would not be where they are today if it wasn't for the initial innovation, expertise, and funding from The Chicago Community Trust. I’ll never forget being a part of some of those decisions."

  • The Explorer

    Frank M. Clark

    • A lifelong Chicagoan, Frank Clark never underestimates the extent to which things can and do change. He recalls a powerful influence that affected his early years in Woodlawn: the Museum of Science and Industry. To him, it was and is a "wonderful haven."

      Now the retired CEO and chairman of ComEd, Mr. Clark hasn’t lost that sense of abundant possibility permeating the city he calls home. And he sees an opportunity to give back. "Chicago has given me a lot," he says.

      In recent years, he’s focused his giving on schools. The Trust’s staff keep him informed about outcomes metrics and shifts in the sector, so he always feels empowered to make strategic, intentional philanthropic decisions. "There is no better way to leverage your dollars for all the things that are important to you," he says ,"than through The Chicago Community Trust."

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Our Mission

is to lead and inspire philanthropic efforts that measurably improve the quality of life and the prosperity of our region.

Founded by banker Albert Harris in 1915, The Chicago Community Trust makes grants to support a wide variety of nonprofit organizations and helps the residents of our region manage their charitable giving. As a community foundation, The Chicago Community Trust (the Trust) is a union of numerous funds, bequests, and other contributions. As a grant maker – with the expertise of our professional staff – we have built partnerships with hundreds of nonprofit organizations providing vital services in the areas of Education, Economic Development, Health, Housing, Human Services, Sustainable Development and Civic and Cultural Vitality. These organizations serve hundreds of thousands of individuals and families in Greater Chicago and beyond. Currently, the Trust’s consolidated assets total $2.1 billion, and we distributed more than $160 million in grants in fiscal year 2013.


Who we are

  • For 99 years, The Chicago Community Trust has connected the generosity of donors with community needs by making grants to organizations working to improve metropolitan Chicago.
  • In 2013, the Trust, together with our donors, granted more than $160 million to nonprofit organizations, enhancing the region by strengthening community schools, assisting arts programs, building health centers, and more.

What we do

  • We are committed to helping metropolitan Chicago thrive as a major global economic center supporting diverse, sustainable communities across the region.
  • The Trust grants enable us to help metropolitan Chicago thrive. Our goal is to lift the region and allow it to be known for not only economic prosperity, but for fostering equity and inclusion, reducing poverty, and solving community problems with innovative public and private solutions.

To learn more about the trust, please visit www.cct.org

  • Professional Staff leadership

    Creating meaningful change takes more than money. It takes discipline, ingenuity and the ability to adapt to shifting landscapes. Meet some of the professional staff members who ensure philanthropy in Chicago is inspired and informed.

  • President and Chief Executive Officer

    Terry Mazany

    Terry Mazany is President and CEO of The Chicago Community Trust. He was selected as the sixth chief executive in the Trust’s ninety-eight year history in 2004. In 2011, Terry served as the interim chief executive officer of Chicago Public Schools, a district of more than 400,000 students and over 650 schools with a budget of $6 billion. In addition, Terry is a member of the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and the Council on Foundations, as well as past chair of its Community Foundation Leadership Team representing the nation’s 700 community foundations. He was also recently appointed by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to serve on the National Assessment Governing Board that oversees the National Assessment of Education Progress, known as our Nation’s Report Card.

    His work in philanthropy is based on fifteen years’ experience in public education in several districts across the country, including Detroit, Chicago, Baltimore, Oakland, and San Francisco. Preceding his work in the public sector, Terry enjoyed his first career as an archaeologist and dendrochronologist, using tree-ring chronologies to date human settlements and develop past climate records.

    Terry earned Master’s degrees in Anthropology and Business Administration at the University of Arizona and a Master’s in Education Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has also been awarded Honorary Doctorate degrees from DePaul University and Lewis University.

  • Vice President of Development
    and Donor Services

    Jamie Phillippe, CFRE

    Jamie Phillippe is Vice President, development and donor services with The Chicago Community Trust. In her role as vice president, Phillippe is responsible for the Trust’s services to its growing donor base, as well as increasing endowment resources to support the needs of metropolitan Chicago’s nonprofit organizations.

    Prior to joining the Trust, she served as vice president of external affairs for the Museum of Science and Industry for thirteen years. In prior fundraising positions, Phillippe worked as vice president and senior-level consultant for The Alford Group and Sumner Rahr & Company. She also served as chief development officer for Bellarmine University and the Louisville Ballet. Phillippe serves as a board member for Butler University and for Common Cause. She has held leadership positions for the Cancer Wellness Center, the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Chicago Foundation for Women, and Women in the Development Professions. She teaches or has taught nonprofit management courses at the University of Notre Dame, University of Chicago, DePaul University, North Park University and the Donors Forum. Phillippe holds a MAT in psychology from the University of Louisville and a BA in psychology from Butler University.

  • Senior Director of Gift Planning

    Jason M. Baxendale, J.D.

    Jason M. Baxendale is senior director of gift planning for The Chicago Community Trust. He is responsible for helping donors to customize their philanthropy, making wise use of the Trust’s vehicles and services. In addition, he works closely with professional advisors to strengthen the Trust’s relationships in their fields of expertise–from accounting, banking and law to financial and wealth consulting.

    Before joining the Trust in 2004, Baxendale served as the associate regional director for the Boy Scouts of America in Naperville, Illinois. He has also served as a relationship manager for Kaspick & Company in Redwood Shores, California and as a trust administrator for UMB Bank in Kansas City, Missouri. Baxendale is a member of the Partnership for Philanthropic Planning, the Chicago Council on Planned Giving, the Chicago Estate Planning Council and the Association of Fundraising Professionals. He received a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in political science from Kansas State University, an MBA degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and a JD degree from Washburn University School of Law.

About the Campaign

We are Chicago.

We are builders. We are dreamers. We look forward to tomorrow, and we won’t just wait to get there.

What’s next for Chicago? That’s in our hands. We each have the power to decide. To write the next chapter for our community. To look past the quick fix, and invest in the future instead.

We Are Chicago is our way forward.

We Are Chicago, The Chicago Community Trust Leadership Campaign, is a promise to the future. In October 2009, the Trust launched this campaign to raise $1 billion in endowment to ensure that it can respond effectively to the most pressing needs facing our region.

We Are Chicago provides individuals and families who are passionate about Chicago an enduring platform to shape their philanthropic legacy. Our unique infrastructure exists only to ensure that your civic passions produce brilliant results.

We put optimism into action, and transform heartfelt generosity into indelible impact.

We invite you to join us.


  • 1

    Simple action

  • 2

    Paths to perpetuity

  • 3

    Vehicles

Infinite Possibilities

You may take the road to philanthropic timelessness by creating an endowment now, or an endowment later.


Two Paths

These two paths are the principal means of ensuring your permanent philanthropic legacy―but there are various ways to expand your options.

  • NOW

    • Your private foundation.
    • Practically speaking, endowments in the present tend to be funded by existing private family foundations.
    • The advantages of converting a foundation into a permanent vehicle through the Trust are many. Converting your private foundation into a permanent fund at the Trust allows you to, among other things, minimize administration, maximize tax benefits, and reduce costs.
  • LATER

    • Your estate.
    • Another option is to create an endowment that takes place in the future through a bequest from your estate.
    • Many donors have made commitments to the Trust that commence only after other matters are settled and heirs have been attended to. An estate gift eventually manifests your perpetual philanthropic legacy with the Trust enforcing your interests.

Three Vehicles

Both paths result in one or more of three predetermined and permanently funded vehicles.

  • 1

    Donor Advised Endowment Fund

    • Definition: A permanent fund managed by the Trust that directs its income according to your ongoing recommendations. Up to two generations of successors may be involved in the distribution of fund assets.
    • This vehicle for perpetual giving allows donors and successor generations the opportunity to stay actively engaged in the granting process.
  • 2

    Field of Interest Fund

    • Definition: A permanent fund managed by the Trust in which your intent will forever be followed. Choose any field of interest, as narrowly or broadly defined as you like, and the Trust will honor your intentions for all time.
    • Your field of interest can be as broad (“improving health in Chicago”) or as narrow (“supporting public sculpture in the Loop”) as you like, and this fund provides a mechanism to honor your intentions forever.
  • 3

    Discretionary Fund

    • Definition: A permanent fund managed by the Trust that directs the fund’s income at the discretion of the Trust to meet the community’s most pressing needs.
    • Described as the “highest and best use” of philanthropic assets, Discretionary Funds are always applied to the community’s most pressing needs at the moment of disbursement. No matter how circumstances may change in the future, these funds within The Chicago Community Trust never become obsolete or misappropriated — their relevant purpose remains intact forever.

Leadership

Campaign Committee

  • King W. Harris, Chair
  • John H. Bryan Jr., Co-Chair
  • John A. Canning Jr.
  • Frank M. Clark
  • Shawn M. Donnelley
  • Marshall Field V
  • Jack M. Greenberg
  • Edgar D. Jannotta Sr.
  • Howard M. McCue III
  • Adele Simmons
  • Frederick H. Waddell

Campaign Stewardship Committee

  • Nancy S. Searle, Chair
  • Prudence R. Beidler
  • Norman R. Bobins
  • Judy Erwin
  • Marshall Field V
  • Marguerite H. Griffin J.D.
  • Sandra P. Guthman
  • Michael L. Keiser
  • Richard P. Kiphart
  • Adele Simmons

Campaign Marketing Committee

  • Linda S. Wolf, Chair
  • María C. Bechily
  • Marshall Field V
  • Denise B. Gardner
  • Michael L. Keiser
  • Donna LaPietra
  • Audrey R. Peeples
  • Cordell Reed
  • Marilynn J. Thoma
  • Arthur R. Velasquez

Executive Committee

The Executive Committee is the governing body of The Chicago Community Trust. It is responsible for all grant allocations made from the Trust, for overseeing asset development and for guiding our general operations. All members of the Executive Committee are appointed by specific authorities to represent the community served by the Trust. These appointing authorities include the mayor of the City of Chicago, presidents and chancellors of universities, presidents and chairpersons of financial institutions and nonprofit organizations, as well as judges from the Circuit Court of Cook County and District Court-Northern District of Illinois.

  • Frank M. Clark, Chairman
  • María C. Bechily
  • Leslie Bluhm
  • Carole L. Brown
  • Martin R. Castro
  • John H. Catlin
  • Shawn M. Donnelley
  • Michael W. Ferro Jr.
  • Denise B. Gardner
  • King W. Harris
  • Christopher G. Kennedy
  • Audrey R. Peeples
  • Mary B. Richardson-Lowry
  • Jesse H. Ruiz
  • Michael Tang
  • Linda S. Wolf

Trustees Committee

Five financial institutions serve as trustees and manage a large portion of the Trust’s assets. The Trustees Committee consists of top-level executive officers from each institution. They appoint up to five members of the Trust’s governing body, the Executive Committee, approve other appointments to the committee and consult and advise on the development of the Trust.

  • Tim Maloney, Chairman Illinois President
    Bank of America
  • Marsha Cruzan President, Chicago Region
    U.S. Bank
  • Mark F. Furlong President and CEO
    BMO Harris Bank, N.A.
  • Glenn F. Tilton Chairman, Midwest Region
    JPMorgan Chase
  • Frederick H. Waddell Chairman and CEO
    The Northern Trust Company

FAQS

TEN questions about the role of the TRUST

  • Q:How have previous donors to the Campaign characterized their involvement?
  • A: Astonishingly, many Trust donors have found themselves to be as transformed by their gift as grant recipients are. The unique pressures of prosperity can intensely affect families ― and not always for the better. Permanent philanthropy of the sort practiced by the Trust is welcomed by visionary families because it builds a positive plan of action and alleviates uncertainty. One Campaign participant told the Trust, “We need you more than you need us.”
  • Q:Will The Chicago Community Trust safeguard my philanthropic intentions in the future?
  • A: Yes, and that’s the importance of the Campaign. It provides absolute reassurance of how your assets will be applied in the future. Today you identify your philanthropic intentions ― where and how you want your assets directed upon the deaths of your successor generations ― and The Chicago Community Trust must honor your intentions. The Trust offers the only vehicle you can use to control your philanthropy after you are gone.
  • Q:Doesn’t The Chicago Community Trust compete against Chicago nonprofits?
  • A: Not at all. The point of the Campaign is to provide permanent funding mechanisms for the organizations you choose to support. From the point of view of the nonprofits you support, the endowment fund created by your estate – that lasts forever – will be ultimately more effective than a single sudden windfall.
  • Q:How does the Trust recognize its Campaign participants?
  • A: The Trust has created the Centennial Society for those who have made endowment commitments (either at present or within their estates) of $1 million or more. The Trust hosts periodic social events in Chicago and elsewhere for this select group of leaders, and the Centennial Society roster is displayed in the lobby of the Trust’s office.
  • Q:How did the Trust’s role evolve?
  • A: The reputation of the Trust is based upon a century of effective and responsible stewardship of assets intended for the greater Chicago community. The Chicago Community Trust acts on behalf of the city’s most prominent families, civic leaders, entrepreneurs and business executives to ensure that their legacies are secure for generations to come.
  • Q:Can I ever change my mind about the causes I wish to support?
  • A: Yes. For as long as you can change your estate (even if you are converting a family foundation), you can also change the direction of your philanthropic assets within the Trust. What the Trust seeks to prevent is any alteration of your intentions after you are gone.
  • Q:How do my advisors fit into the overall picture?
  • A: The Trust assumes that your advisors are “part of the family,” in the sense that they, like us, are seeking to carry out your intentions. We welcome their participation to whatever degree you specify. The Trust works cooperatively with your attorneys, family office, financial advisors, investment and wealth managers, and other trusted advisors. You can invite your investment managers to continue to manage your assets of $1 million and above within the Trust. Most of the Trust’s donors are in fact referred to us by their advisors because they recognize the value of partnering with the Trust.
  • Q:When does my participation in the Trust come to an end?
  • A: For every participant in The Chicago Community Trust Leadership Campaign, the answer is “Never.” After your successor generations ― typically children and grandchildren ― are gone, your participation continues as an individually named endowment fund (e.g., the John and Jane Smith Fund). The fund name and its grant making function remain in perpetuity. Your named fund persists forever as your permanent legacy in Chicago philanthropy.
  • Q:How do people react when they first learn of The Chicago Community Trust Leadership Campaign?
  • A: The appeal of the Campaign and personal reactions to it have been remarkably consistent: “This is a great idea. This is a great thing to do for Chicago and for my family. And I trust the Trust to do it well.”
  • Q:What is the ideal timing for participation in the Campaign?
  • A: There is no ideal, but we have heard from donors that the clarity of the plan of action has relieved them of a great deal of worry. A typical remark is “I wish I knew about this years ago.” For that reason, sooner appears to be better.

More questions?
Contact us

A FUTURE 100 YEARS IN THE MAKING

a brief History of the trust

  • 1915

    The Chicago Community Trust is founded by Norman and Albert Harris.

  • 1920

    Research reveals a gap in services for immigrants. The Trust invests.

  • 1930

    The Trust embraces prevention as a health strategy that reduces suffering and saves lives.

  • 1944

    Putting resources behind the idea that excellent casework can keep families intact, the Trust makes grants to seven child care agencies.

  • 1955

    Public television debuts in Chicago. The Trust makes a $10,000 grant to WTTW.

  • 1968

    A Trust grant of $115,250 helps preserve the last tract of virgin prairie in Cook County.

  • 1970

    To address a shortage of African Americans in the health professions, the Trust invests in medical, dental and nursing education of minority students.

  • 1975

    The Trust launches the Life Options program to serve the needs of the growing senior population.

  • 1979

    The Trust helps establish the Joint Energy Conservation Fund.

  • 1985

    Child care agencies without access to capital receive low-interest loans for renovation projects from the Trust.

  • 1990

    Chicago Matters—a project of the Trust, the Chicago Public Library, The Chicago Reporter and WBEZ—begins a 19-year run of examining and reporting on wide-ranging civic topics.

  • 2001

    The Trust commits one-third of its resources to achieving large-scale improvement in Chicago’s schools. This is made possible by the Searle Funds at the Chicago Community Trust.

  • 2003

    With the Trust as a key funder, Harris Theater opens, providing much- needed space suitable for mid-sized dance and music performances.

  • 2007

    The Trust launches the Immigrant Integration Initiative, increasing civic engagement and investing in immigrant-led organizations.

  • 2009

    The Trust increases basic human needs grantmaking from $13 million to $21 million per year, connecting local resources to help prevent foreclosures.

  • 2010

    With the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP), the Trust launches MetroPulse, an online portal that tracks quality-of-life indicators.

Centennial Society

The Centennial Society celebrates transformative philanthropy. Members ensure their legacy of charitable impact through endowment gifts of $1,000,000 or greater to the We Are Chicago campaign.

  • Jimmie R. Alford* and Ms. Maree G. Bullock
  • Carol Lavin Bernick
  • The Robert Thomas Bobins Foundation
  • Baird Brown*
  • Neville and John Bryan
  • Mr. and Mrs. John A. Canning Jr.
  • Vera and Frank Clark
  • Alberto Culver Foundation
  • Ms. Shawn M. Donnelley and Dr. Christopher M. Kelly
  • Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Field V
  • The Glasser and Rosenthal Family
  • Harris Family Foundation
  • Donna and Jack Greenberg
  • Michael and Mona Heath
  • Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Keiser
  • Judy and John P. Keller
  • Patricia and Martin Koldyke
  • Bernice* and Leonard Lavin
  • Paul J. Leaman Jr.
  • Mary* and Charles Liebman
  • Charlotte Lindon
  • Laurel Appell Lipkin
  • Thomas and Susan Lydon
  • The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
  • Scott W. McCausland
  • William McKittrick*
  • Joseph Pedott Family Fund
  • Bob* and Mary Reusché
  • The Rhoades Foundation
  • John G. and Frances C. Searle*
  • Sylvia Simon Sights*
  • Madeline Block Willner*
  • Anonymous (12)

* deceased

Contact Us

ONE simple action. TWO paths to perpetuity. THREE vehicles. INFINITE possibilities

You may take the road to philanthropic timelessness by creating an endowment now, or an endowment later.


Two Paths

The experts of the Trust, in consultation with your advisors, can determine the optimal arrangement for your goals and preferences.

These two paths are the principal means of ensuring your permanent philanthropic legacy―but there are various ways to expand your options.


Now

  • Your private foundation.
  • Practically speaking, endowments in the present tend to be funded by existing private family foundations.
  • The advantages of converting a foundation into a permanent vehicle through the Trust are many. Converting your private foundation into a permanent fund at the Trust allows you to, among other things, minimize administration, maximize tax benefits, and reduce costs.

Later

  • Your estate.
  • Another option is to create an endowment that takes place in the future through a bequest from your estate.
  • Many donors have made commitments to the Trust that commence only after other matters are settled and heirs have been attended to. An estate gift eventually manifests your perpetual philanthropic legacy with the Trust, enforcing your interests.

THREE VEHICLES

Both paths result in one or more of three predetermined and permanently funded vehicles.

  • 1

    Donor Advised Endowment Fund

    • Definition: A permanent fund managed by the Trust that directs its income according to your ongoing recommendations. Up to two generations of successors may be involved in the distribution of fund assets.
    • This vehicle for perpetual giving allows donors and successor generations the opportunity to stay actively engaged in the granting process.
  • 2

    Field of Interest Fund

    • Definition: A permanent fund managed by the Trust in which your intent will forever be followed. Choose any field of interest, as narrowly or broadly defined as you like, and the Trust will honor your intentions for all time.
    • Your field of interest can be as broad (“improving health in Chicago”) or as narrow (“supporting public sculpture in the Loop”) as you like, and this fund still provides a mechanism to honor your intentions forever.
  • 3

    Discretionary Fund

    • Definition: A permanent fund managed by the Trust that directs the fund’s income at the discretion of the Trust to meet the community’s most pressing needs.
    • Described as the “highest and best use” of philanthropic assets, Discretionary Funds are always applied to the community’s most pressing needs at the moment of disbursement. No matter how circumstances may change in the future, these Funds within The Chicago Community Trust never become obsolete or misappropriated — their relevant purpose remains intact forever.
  • The path to planning your legacy starts here.

  • Jamie Phillippe

    vice president of development
    and donor services

    jamiep@cct.org
    312.616.8000 x 136

  • Jason M. Baxendale

    senior director of gift planning

    jbaxendale@cct.org
    312.616.8000 x 110

Have Questions? See our FAQ.